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Blog Archives

Cadbury Dairy Milk pairs with American classics

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The last time I blogged about Cadbury, I was reviewing their line of Marvellous Creations, which paired Pop Rocks-style candy and honeycomb shards into its trademark British milk chocolate.

This time around, Cadbury has gone a little wild and paired Cadbury Dairy Milk with Oreo, with LU biscuits (why do I still remember the commercial jingle to this like I had just seen it yesterday? “A cookie is a cookie and a LU is a LU”) and Cadbury Dairy Milk with Ritz crackers.

I haven’t tried any of these so can’t review it properly, but if anyone has tried it, please let me know what you thought of it. I’m intrigued.

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The secret ingredient to perfect scones

Maybe it was hearing this story on NPR’s “Fresh Air” last week, but I’ve had “America’s Test Kitchen” on the brain and wanted to test drive one of their recipes.

This weekend, I decided to try a new current scone recipe and why not see WWATKD (What Would America’s Test Kitchen Do?)

Their cream scone with currants recipe proved to be ridiculously amazing and even better than the Epicurious recipe that has been my go-to scone recipe for the past year. Scone agnostics need to check this out.

Cream scones with currants

The secret ingredient? Cream. I know. It’s not very British. But tasting is believing!

Cream Scones with Currants

2 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for the counter
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes and chilled
1/2 cup currants
1 cup heavy cream

1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 450 degrees. Pulse the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt together in a food processor to combine, about 6 pulses. Scatter the butter evenly over the top and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal with a few slightly larger butter lumps, about 12 pulses.

2. Add the currants and quickly pulse once to combine. Transfer the dough to a large bowl. Stir in the cream with a rubber spatula until the dough begins to form, about 30 seconds.

3. Turn the dough and any floury bits out onto a floured counter and knead until it forms a rough, slightly sticky ball, 5 to 10 seconds. Press the dough into a 9-inch pan. Unmold the dough and cut into 8 wedges. Place the wedges on an ungreased baking sheet.

4. Bake until the scone tops are light brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Cool on a wire rack for at least 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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